Frequently Asked Questions

Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan - FAQs

Who established the Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Planning Initiative?

A senior-level committee was appointed by Chancellor Linda Katehi in 2014 to develop a diversity and inclusion strategic plan to complement and support broader campus plans, including the 20/20 Initiative and the UC Davis 21st Century visioning project. Under the leadership of Dr. Suad Joseph, the committee set a strong foundation for the planning process.

In July 2015, the chancellor renewed her commitment to diversity and inclusion by expanding the role of Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Adela de la Torre to include campus diversity. Vice Chancellor de la Torre assumed leadership of the strategic planning committee in October 2015. Please see the introductory pages to the draft plan (pp. 2-7) and visit the Diversity and Inclusion Initiative homepage for more information.

Why was this draft plan for diversity and inclusion written?

This initiative was undertaken with a commitment to the notion that diversity and educational excellence go hand in hand and that we cannot have one without the other. To meet the goals of UC Davis’ 2020 Initiative, the campus’ significant enrollment is aligned with the development of a more diverse and inclusive community. Please see the introductory pages to the draft plan (pp. 2-7) and visit the Diversity and Inclusion Initiative homepage for more information.

What is the expected outcome of this strategic plan?

A clear plan will move UC Davis toward its goal of inclusion excellence, the condition in which all members of a community are encouraged and supported to work, study and learn in a way that allows each of us to reach our full potential. By focusing on key areas such as pipeline and recruitment, climate, research and teaching, policy and practice, this plan will provide a blueprint to help the entire campus community accomplish these crucial goals. Please see the introductory pages to the draft plan (pp. 2-7) for more information.

What/who are the “working groups”?

The working groups represent six key campus constituents:

  1. Regional stakeholders
  2. Undergraduates (represented by the Student Committee on Campus Climate)
  3. Graduate and professional students and postdocs
  4. Academic Senate
  5. Academic Federation
  6. Staff

Additionally, three advisory groups were created to provide information and support concerning development of a diverse pipeline, data management and analysis and communications. Within each working group, members were carefully chosen to represent the many different stakeholders on campus.

The working groups facilitated forums and meetings to gather community input and helped formulate the recommendations of the draft plan. Please see the sections of the draft plan on Context and Methodology (p. 5) and Committee Members and Advisers (p. 22) for more information.

How was this draft plan developed?

The chancellor charged the Strategic Planning Committee in August 2014, and the original committee (later reorganized into the Diversity and Inclusion Steering Committee) began to meet in October 2014.

The Steering Committee spent its first year setting the foundation for the planning process and in October 2015, set forth themes and goals for their work based on a review of past initiatives addressing diversity and inclusion, active programs on campus and best practices from diversity initiatives at peer institutions.

Working groups, consisting of a cross-section of community representatives (faculty, staff and students), met throughout the past year to review reports from prior initiatives (2007-2014) and ongoing efforts to identify baselines from which to launch the four themes of this present initiative.  

The Steering Committee and working group facilitators conducted extensive engagement forums across the Davis campus and the Health System between November 2015 and April 2016. An analysis of key findings from the forums contributed to drafting plan recommendations reflecting the most current concerns emerging as a pattern.

UC Davis hosted Dr. Daryl Smith, a nationally renowned leader in diversity and inclusion efforts in higher education, for two days in February to provide opportunity for dialogues across the main campus and medical center and consultations on the planning process.

The chancellor appointed several other committees to address access to success and workplace climate: The Human Equity Subcommittee of the University of the 21st Century Committee, the UC Davis Equity Task Force and the Task Force on Workplace Climate, all of which have informed the recommendations contained in this report. Please see the sections of the draft plan on Context and Methodology (p. 5) and Committee Members and Advisers (p. 22) for more information. 

How long has this strategic planning process taken?

The chancellor charged the Strategic Planning Committee in August 2014, and the original committee (later reorganized into the Diversity and Inclusion Steering Committee) began to meet in October 2014. The committee spent its first year setting the foundation for the planning process. In October 2015, the steering committee set forth themes and goals that guided the working groups. The working groups reviewed existing reports and efforts and conducted extensive engagement forums across the campus and the health system between November 2015 and April 2016. Please see the Key Events Timeline in the draft plan (p. 6).

Did you solicit campus community input to write the plan?

Yes. Numerous engagement forums and stakeholder meetings were held throughout this process to solicit input and ideas from the campus community and surrounding communities.

The campus engagement process launched in November 2015 with a forum that was attended by almost 300 students, staff, faculty, and community members. Between November 2015 and April 2016 there were 29 engagement forums facilitated at the main campus or the health system’s Sacramento campus.

Please see the sections of the draft plan on Context and Methodology (p. 5) and Committee Members and Advisers (p. 22) for more information or visit the Diversity and Inclusion Initiative homepage for more information on previous engagement forums.

When will the strategic plan be finalized?

The final version of this plan will be released in January 2017. The intervening months between now and then are devoted to vetting the plan draft with the community to seek feedback and make adjustments to the final copy. 

How will my feedback be utilized?

All feedback will be recorded and disseminated to the diversity and inclusion initiative committee, formed for the purpose of developing a campus-wide strategic plan for diversity and inclusion. The committee is made up of students, faculty, and staff. All suggestions will be considered for inclusion in the strategic plan. If you have comments or ideas please use the link to the anonymous feedback form on the draft plan’s main page or send an email (not anonymous) to diversityinclusion@ucdavis.edu.

Will there be any engagement forums to provide in-person feedback?

Yes. There are plans to begin campus community engagement forums in fall 2016. Please visit the Diversity and Inclusion Initiative homepage for scheduling information as it becomes available.

How can I provide feedback to the committee?

If you would like to provide anonymous feedback, please use the online feedback form. You may also email your feedback to diversityinclusion@ucdavis.edu (which is not anonymous).

What are the next steps?

The public comment period for the plan draft will run through the first week of December 2016. In April 2017 a final plan will be published and an implementation phase will begin that will consist of working strategically with campus constituencies to ensure that the plan becomes operational at the department, unit, school and college levels. Recommendations will be addressed in ways that progress can be accurately measured. Accountability plans for schools, colleges, units and departments will enable stakeholders to track progress and identify areas needing additional attention and resources.