Equity Summit Workshop Schedule

Register for the 2015 Equity Summit

Radical Healing in Times of Trauma

Join together with colleagues to learn about equity-based initiatives, ideas and possibilities. Develop a deeper understanding and an action agenda around key focus areas.

Saturday, March 14, 2015
8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
UC Davis Conference Center
(free parking on weekends)

Register online

Download the flyer

Workshop Series 1: 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Location
Solving the Inequality
Jameel Pugh, Founder and President, Xpose The Gap

Educator and filmmaker Jameel Pugh will screen and discuss his most recent film, “Solving The Inequality,” a film that tells the powerful story of Kadhir Rajagopal, Ph.D.’s remarkably effective strategy and techniques for transforming the academic outcomes of students in urban classrooms. Against all odds, Dr. Rajagopal was determined to make a difference in the lives of his students. In 2011 he started the C.R.E.A.T.E Academy Instructional Model as a pilot program to significantly raise the bar of achievement for the lowest-performing incoming ninth graders. “I am launching a revolution to transform my urban school into a college-going powerhouse,” says Dr. Rajagopal. In three years, C.R.E.A.T.E students have shown strong signs of growth in the classroom. This film is not only an inspirational story of hope but also a source of practical steps for teachers, parents and students to solve the inequalities of urban public education.
Alumni/AGR Room
The History of Race and Violence: How it affects everything we do in education and every other major institution
Sandy Holman, Director, United in Unity and The Culture C.O.-O.P
Akira Kumamoto, UC Davis Student

This workshop will confront and examine the history of race and violence in this country and how it impacts our ability to be effective with people in every institution, especially with youth and people of color. Often our solutions are not effective because we forget the root causes of the inequities that we see today in society. We come up with “Band-Aid” approaches that do not change systems. If we are serious about making a difference, healing persistent trauma that is impacting huge groups of people, and addressing insidious inequities that exist by design, we must be honest and strategic. This workshop will take an honest look at white supremacy, systemic designs and their continued impact, and explore solutions that are real. Anyone interested in improving the status quo is welcome and encouraged to attend.
Alumni/West Conference Room
The Write to Heal: Using Radical Writing Techniques to Repurpose the Classroom
• Patrice Hill, SAYS Coordinator
Denisha Bland, SAYS Lead Poet-Mentor Educator
Andre Tillman, SAYS Poet-Mentor Educator

Using evidence-based literacy techniques, Sacramento Area Youth Speaks (SAYS) poet-mentor educators will guide participants through an intensive and creative writing workshop. Focusing on personal narratives and trauma, participants will produce a declarative statement on personal healing and how they chose to process and overcome trauma and pain in their personal lives. Participants will gain an array of engagement strategies and tools needed to take this workshop back to their sites and facilitate personal, creative and therapeutic writings.
Alumni/Founders Board Room
The Hidden Language of Exclusion: Overriding Systemic Bias and Disproportionate Suspension
Macheo Payne, Ed.D., M.S.W, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work, California State University East Bay

This workshop unpacks the black male discipline gap from a critical race lens, looking at the multi-layered bias of systemic, institutional and interpersonal racism in the classroom. Looking at the classroom level, three micro resistances that are race responsive are presented that address disproportionate out-of-class referrals of black males. Two tenets of critical race, the “right to exclude” and the “colorblind myth” are countered by the three commitments that represent effective teachers’ values and practices in the classroom. The commitment to address systemic inequity, being courageous, and emotionally committing to black male students learning, directly address the multi-layered bias that manifests in the classroom. Participants are engaged in large and small groups to reflect on the range of experiences and expertise in the room. The presentation uses group activities, short video clips and a reflective writing exercise, all with the support of a Powerpoint and workshop outline.
Alumni/Allewelt Room
Recent Developments in HIV Prevention and Treatment
James E.K. Hildreth, Ph.D., M.D., Dean of College of Biological Sciences and Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, UC Davis

The last several years have seen many very promising developments in HIV prevention as well as some disappointing setbacks. A large microbicide trial was halted for lack of efficacy even though a similar prior study produced very encouraging data. Three large vaccine trials failed to show protection and in all three there was a strong trend toward the vaccine recipients being more predisposed to infection than the controls. Preclinical results from prevention and treatment studies in non-human primate models have generated a great deal of excitement but it is not clear that these results can be replicated in humans. In this session, these studies and others will be reviewed and possible explanations for the failed studies will be discussed. The challenges of translating promising animal studies into effective treatments or prophylactics in humans will also be considered. A question and answer session will be held at end of the session.
Conference Room A
In Search of Racial Equity: Davis Student Research Scholars Present 10 Years of District and Student Survey Data
Jann Murray-García, M.D., M.P.H., Assistant Adjunct Professor at the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, UC Davis

Student Panel, Davis High School and Emerson Junior High School
Spring 2014 marked the 10th anniversary of the initial, groundbreaking presentation of district-level data, as well as student focus group and written survey data, collected and analyzed by Davis High School student research scholars (Davis, CA). Much has changed in the Davis community and in its schools since 2004, in large part led by its youth. Come hear about the community and school progress through 10 years of these same data sources, analyzed and presented today by a cohort of student research scholars from Davis Senior High School and Emerson Junior High School. Current findings and data trends over the last decade are both encouraging and disturbing.
Conference Room B
Workshop Series 2: 1-2:15 p.m. Location
Spiritrials in Conversation
Dahlak Brathwaite, B.A. ‘08, Co-founder, UC Davis SickSpits  

In Dahlak’s one-man play “Spiritrials,” addiction, religion and the law intersect in a government sponsored drug rehabilitation program. A timely exploration of the criminal justice system, “Spirituals” uses Dahlak’s personal experiences to embody an “Anonymous” narrator who is forced into the program upon court order. Dahlak will be performing sections of the play and leading a conversation around different themes that are addressed.
Alumni/AGR Room
Effectively Partnering with Undocumented Students
Andrea Gaytan, Director, AB540 and Undocumented Student Center, UC Davis
Vanessa Segundo, Outreach and Training Coordinator, AB540 and Undocumented Student Center, UC Davis

The goal of this training will be to assist participants in developing skills, frameworks and approaches for effectively partnering with undocumented students. Although there will be a focus on engaging and serving undocumented students enrolled in post-secondary institutions, best practices that transfer to other educational levels will also be referenced. Participants can expect to articulate experiences and challenges of undocumented students, identify and make a commitment to using immigrant sensitive language and personalize their approach to serving all students regardless of their immigration status.
Alumni/West Conference Room
Keeping it Real: Race, Class, and Youth Connections through Hip-Hop in the U.S. and Brazil
Halifu Osumare, Ph.D., Professor, African American and African Studies, UC Davis

As hip-hop youth culture has become global, it has particular resonance in the African diaspora. The Africanist aesthetics of hip-hop—polyrhythm, call-and-response, an orality of social commentary, and vital dance embodiment—form cultural connections throughout the diaspora. But, I also argue for socio-economic “connective marginalities” that represent extant social inequalities binding youths through hip-hop culture throughout the diaspora. Racial, class and generational inequalities form another basis for why hip-hop has spread from the U.S. to Brazil, for example, with such a vengeance. This interactive presentation explores these socio-political connections between the U.S. and Brazil. Like the U.S., Brazil suffers from similar social, political and cultural problems—second-class citizenship, poverty, stereotyping and racial profiling. These social inequalities link Black Americans and Afro-Brazilians, and are revealed in the content of hip-hop youths’ raps, graffiti art and musical remixes in both countries. By viewing these “connective marginalities” through hip-hop, we can also envision the healing and empowerment globally.
Alumni/Founders Board Room
The Hidden Language of Exclusion: Overriding Systemic Bias and Disproportionate Suspension
Macheo Payne, Ed.D., M.S.W, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work, California State University East Bay

This workshop unpacks the black male discipline gap from a critical race lens, looking at the multi-layered bias of systemic, institutional and interpersonal racism in the classroom. Looking at the classroom level, three micro resistances that are race responsive are presented that address disproportionate out-of-class referrals of black males. Two tenets of critical race, the “right to exclude” and the “colorblind myth” are countered by the three commitments that represent effective teachers’ values and practices in the classroom. The commitment to address systemic inequity, being courageous, and emotionally committing to black male students learning, directly address the multi-layered bias that manifests in the classroom. Participants are engaged in large and small groups to reflect on the range of experiences and expertise in the room. The presentation uses group activities, short video clips and a reflective writing exercise, all with the support of a Powerpoint and workshop outline.
Alumni/Allewelt Room
Healing through Culture; Organizing through Hope: How to Effectively Engage Boys and Men of Color in Community Building Efforts
Jose Flores, Youth Organizer
Tariq Mohammed, Youth Organizer

An interactive discussion where youth can share their collective experience to better understand the root causes of problems in our communities and develop solutions for boys and men of color. Participants and facilitators will learn practical ways that organizations and communities can build a stronger multicultural youth movement. Ultimately, we want to promote youth empowerment and social change to reduce societal violence by incorporating boys and young men into the community building process.
Conference Room A
The Role of Cultural Proficiency in Education
Tina Jordan, Ed.D., Director, Peer and Academic Resource Center (PARC), Department of English, California State University, Sacramento
Lesley Gale, Ed.D., Professor of English and CASSL Coordinator, Cosumnes River College
Vickie Gomez, Director, Campus and Student Community Engagement, Offices of the Chancellor, UC Davis
Margaret Williams, Ed.D., Department Chair, Communication Studies, Sierra College

This workshop seeks to foster awareness of the role of cultural proficiency in all aspects of the educational enterprise, including a discussion of the benefits of culturally responsive practices, as well as the barriers to culturally responsive classroom practices, leadership, professional development and the recruitment and retention of educational leaders.
Conference Room B